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Quotes from Songs: ‘I Go for Broke’

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I can literally apply this line to every aspect of my life.

… I go for broke, a lesson I can’t afford, but for what it’s worth I’m ready to pay… For the rest of my life!

When my determination’s burning a whole in my chest and I just gotta go for that thing that makes me come alive. When that feeling’s that strong, the cost to accomplish it is then but a fraction of my concern.

This track takes me to that brink, every-single-time, and I love it!

  Rest of My Life – Ludacris Feat. Usher, David Guetta

Image Source: http://goo.gl/9pn07I

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Nothing Controls Me, Until I Decide To Give It My Permission To Do So.

I'm Doing This for MeToday was a pretty BIG day for me, I’ll tell you why. Thirty days ago I agreed to a sugar-free challenge with a very close friend of mine – someone I consider to be an older sister, a person I have a lifetime’s worth of respect for. I am so happy that I agreed because, today marks DAY 30 and therefore the end of the challenge, yet the beginning of a brand new lifestyle for my wife (who was in on the challenge – and was totally amazing), our kids and I.To understate what, and how I feel… I can only but say that I feel, absolutely, amazing.

Don’t get me wrong, I won’t and cannot say that we went completely sugar-free, but the cut-back on our sugar intake was in my view notably significant. It is important to note, the principle behind our decision; to take back control from what we believe was dictating our eating habits, that completely dwarfs the nitty-gritties of this challenge.

Trust me, there are some of my very close friends who will remember me taking a whopping 8 – yes you read that right, I took EIGHT – teaspoons of the white stuff in my coffee up until 2002. In that same year I cut back that intake to a meager two in… just one decision. Then in 2007, with the encouragement of another amazing friend, I cut it right down to zero in [good] filter coffee and remained on two in any other forms of caffeine.

In addition to my passion for the powder in all things edible; I love cake, fizzy drinks, tarts, chocolates, the list goes on but guess what, I made it through 30 days without any of it and that in itself is amazing for me, Elridge.

I think what stands out for me about these last few days and what I’ve learnt from my personal experience, coming through what seems like a process is this. Sugar didn’t control me. It was me telling myself that I needed it, because of cultivated bad habits which I developed and nurtured over time. I realized that I am not dependent on anything unless I choose to be. Yes, nothing controls me until I decide to give it permission to do so.

Now, looking back, I am proud to sit/stand here -30 days later – knowing I’ve accomplished something which I (after I gave my yes) thought I would never get through. I’ve taken control of another area in my life and look forward to do the same in the next.

Truth is, I’ll only get one shot at this life, why not live it healthy, free and full of energy. Oh and I feel good, because this time… I’m doing this for me!

Image Source: http://goo.gl/cHj0zx

How To Transform your brand through Story & Action

Branding, Marketing, Action, Passion

Cole Cornerr

For all companies, having a story and knowing that story are crucial steps to achieving success. On the other hand, I’m worried that too many marketers think that telling their story through advertising is enough. It’s NOT! In fact, those that think this way do so at their own risk because there is a new kind of company on the rise that uses story in a more powerful way — and they run more efficient and profitable businesses as a result. It is extremely important that brands pay more attention to showing their story through ACTION & NOT COMMUNICATION! In the commercial above I love how Nike not only told us how to just do it, but they always keep their audience involved within EVERY move they make! The story that they told connected with millions, but what made it great is how they created action & gave their audience opportunities…

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The Things Successful People Know About Turning Your Passion into a Dream Job

Boeing LandingYesterday, on our way back from a family gathering, my wife got into an intensely stimulating discussion about our dreams and ambitions. It was one of those conversations that had the potential to last for hours. But… in the middle of my tangent – about what I really want to do – vocalizing my elaborate desires and dreams, she utters with a slight hint of a smile; “There goes your passion.” It was a Boeing 737 flying overhead, on its final approach to the nearby Cape Town International Airport.

I immediately went quiet. For a moment I couldn’t believe that I just let go of that dream. I wanted to be a pilot with all my heart and I love flying till this day. I am sure I never pursued my dream due to my inability to stick close to or surround myself with people who were in a position to take me toward that dream. In hindsight I now realize I in fact had such an opportunity (Vanderbijlpark, ZA – 2002) and I didn’t even get the hint. So, I think I needed that nudge and probably even owe a thank you to her for unintentionally dusting off and flipping that switch for me.

And now in celebrating my moment, and perhaps a moment you may have had, I am certain you’ll find the essence of this article as inspiring as I have.

Originally Written By: Michael McCutcheon

A fifth grader from Georgia goes to space camp and experiences weightlessness for the first time. A few years later, he’s standing spellbound at an airshow. At 22, he walks into a conference room to broker the sale of a multimillion-dollar airplane and a business is born. Jamail Larkins, now 30, is the founder and CEO of Ascension Air.

It’s an incredible career full of lessons learned, and if you ask him about it, he’s still at the beginning. Ascension Air leases small aircrafts to pilots, who can then access a fleet of planes for a fraction of the price. It has 24 full-time employees and bases in Atlanta and Ft. Lauderdale and, with $8 million in annual revenue, it’s already a success. But his vision is bigger. Larkins wants to operate in every major metropolitan area. He wants to turn Ascension into a household name.

In an interview with Mic, Larkins, who’s often mentioned as one of the top entrepreneurs under 30 in the country, lays out some of the biggest lessons he’s learned about identifying one’s passion and turning it into a dream job. Because for so many young people who want to make an impact, the challenge is often identifying the what — what do I love to do and how do I make it happen?

  1. Identify the experiences you can’t shake.

Don’t waste a moment sitting behind your desk wondering, “What should I do with my life,” says Larkins. It’s the wrong question to ask.

The better question is: What experiences have you had that you can’t shake, that have had a profound effect on who you are? Build your identity around those.

Upon asking Larkins if there was a specific moment he could pinpoint, where he knew what he was going to do with his life, he laughs. He identifies a few different experiences that stayed with him instead, like going to space camp for the first time and later an airshow: “I thought it would be so cool to be one of those [pilots performing in an airshow] … everyone just watching me.”

He kept following his interests. After the airshow, Larkins started taking lessons. A year later, at 14, he petitioned the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to let him fly solo. The FAA wouldn’t let him (you have to be at least 16 to fly solo in the U.S.), so he traveled to Canada, where the age restrictions are looser. By then, flying was his full-blown passion.

  1. Surround yourself with those experiences.

Once you know which experiences really speak to you, immerse yourself in a related industry.

When Larkins got back from Canada, he landed jobs selling flight instruction manuals and washing airplanes. He continued doing things that kept him close to flying.

“I came from an average middle-class family. I realized as a kid that if I’m going to fly when I want to fly, I’m going to have to afford to do it on my own.” That’s when the pieces started coming together.

  1. Make connections and be ready.

It’s one of the most important lessons. Larkins does everything he can to stay up-to-date on the industry and the people in it — what they’re doing, what interests them — so if he’s ever in a room, he can connect with them and be ready for any opportunity.

“Networking is huge,” he says. “It’s hard to describe how important the people you meet and know are … and that’s really about preparation. Whatever it is you want … you’ll never get it unless you’re ready for it.”

When Larkins was in college, a wealthy friend was interested in leasing a plane. Larkins said, “I can help you with that,” and called someone he knew from Embry-Riddle, an aeronautics school, to help him broker the deal. His first one.

  1. People will discourage you, but forget them.

Don’t let other people’s hang-ups over your age, race, gender or anything else deter you. Larkins recalls walking into the conference room to seal that multimillion-dollar deal.

“The closing guy representing the company … when I walked in, he looked at me like, ‘There’s no way that this is the guy signing the paperwork.’ Looks can be deceiving,” Larkins says, laughing. No one knows your dream better than you do.

  1. Keep your eye on your goal and don’t stop.

Big dreams can seem so far away it’s sometimes hard to know where to begin. But if you have the guts to start, with every obstacle you overcome the more you’ll want to achieve.

Today, Larkins operates Ascension Air with bases in Atlanta and Ft. Lauderdale, but he has expansion plans that put every U.S. city in his sights. It’s a daunting vision that leaves an incredible amount of work undone.

“We’ve got a really long way to go,” Larkins says. “We may never accomplish it, but it’s the goal I’m going for.”

  1. Find role models and people you can learn from.

You’re not the first person to walk this path. If you need inspiration, it’s everywhere.

“I read a lot of biographies of people who have nothing to do with aviation,” Larkins says, “but are successful in their own way … and I look at the things they’ve done and try to apply them to my own life.”

Chances are, if you do the same, your career will start taking shape and bend closer and closer to the dream you’ve always had.

 

Information Source: http://goo.gl/BUWaFH | Image Source: http://goo.gl/4spxn5

 

Following your PASSION!

PassionI’ve been listening to David Wood since 2011. I am sure that if it wasn’t for the perspectives that I’ve gained from listening to him – almost every day – over the past 3 years, I would’ve – still today – been a miserable, depressed and broken person.

Through listening to the unrehearsed, honest and transparent conversations he has with his guests on his show; The Kickass Life, I think I felt empowered to – for the first time in my life – give myself the permission to be myself. I felt empowered to be unapologetic about the things that I’m passionate about and that it’s fine that I don’t have it all figured out.

A few days ago I listened to this interview David had with Mike Johnston, man, what a guy. I really don’t mean to spoil the show for you, because it has some serious nuggets in it, but I really gotta tell you this. Not even a couple of moments into the show Mike drops this after David asks him if he was always passionate.

Mike responds to the question saying this; “I’ve always been passionate about teaching. I wanted to retain the information so I can pass it on to somebody else in a more easily digestible way. When somebody taught me history I’m constantly reteaching myself how I was gonna explain it somebody else…. My passion is delivering information to people in a way that they never had it delivered to them before.”

I was like, that’s me, that’s me right there!

I love making things simple and have a pet peeve against jargon in any shape or form. I will figure it out and go on a bend to make it easily understandable for myself and for those affected by it.

Mike accurately worded what I’ve been passionate about for a very, very long time now, and thanks to him, I can finally verbalize yet another one of my passions. Nonetheless an incredibly empowering listen so make some time to indulge, I doubt you’ll be disappointed.

321 – Find & Follow your PASSION with Mike Johnston | The Kickass Life Podcast with David Wood.

Podcast Source: http://goo.gl/C8riWF | Image Source: http://goo.gl/p1NS93 | Links to visit: http://www.mikeslessons.com/ | http://www.thekickasslife.com/

Will You Still Like Me…When I Don’t Buy?

Firstly, awesome blog post Jeff!

My view is that so many brands which we’ve come to ‘trust’ loose their touch because their focus shifts away from their customers. It’s almost that you want to ask some of them; “what happened to the passion?”

Great perspectives and great quotes.

Your Life Empowered

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So many people today tweet, share, postcomment, and like, all to get you to do what? To BUY! “Well, of course! Isn’t that why we all do what we do?”

In the emerging trend of social media selling, it’s hard to even like someone’s page, connect with them on Twitter, exchange an email, or comment on their blog without getting a barrage of unsolicited solicitation. My “like” was not payment or currency given in exchange for your sales pitch; I simply liked your blog.

Will you still like me when I don’t buy?

Not everyone is in the business for the business. Some simply do what they do because they love to do it. Stephen King is quoted saying, “Yes, I’ve made a great deal of dough from my fiction, but I never set a single word down on paper with the thought of being…

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